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Tue 10 Nov 2020 01:30 - 01:35 at Virtual room 2 - Analysis 2

Call graphs have many applications in software engineering, including bug-finding, security analysis, and code navigation in IDEs. However, the construction of call graphs requires significant investment in program analysis infrastructure. An increasing number of programming languages compile to the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and program analysis frameworks such as WALA and SOOT support a broad range of program analysis algorithms by analyzing JVM bytecode. This approach has been shown to work well when applied to bytecode produced from Java code. In this paper, we show that it also works well for diverse other JVM-hosted languages: dynamically-typed functional Scheme, statically-typed object-oriented Scala, and polymorphic functional OCaml. Effectively, we get call graph construction for these languages for free, using existing analysis infrastructure for Java, with only minor challenges to soundness. This, in turn, suggests that bytecode-based analysis could serve as an implementation vehicle for bug-finding, security analysis, and IDE features for these languages. We present qualitative and quantitative analyses of the soundness and precision of call graphs constructed from JVM bytecodes for these languages, and also for Groovy, Clojure, Python, and Ruby. However, we also show that implementation details matter greatly. In particular, the JVM-hosted implementations of Groovy, Clojure, Python, and Ruby produce very unsound call graphs, due to the pervasive use of reflection, invokedynamic instructions, and run-time code generation. Interestingly, the dynamic translation schemes employed by these languages, which result in unsound static call graphs, tend to be correlated with poor performance at run time.

Tue 10 Nov
Times are displayed in time zone: (UTC) Coordinated Universal Time change

01:30 - 01:35
Talk
Journal First
Karim AliUniversity of Alberta, Xiaoni LaiGoogle, Zhaoyi LuoMicrosoft, Ondřej LhotákUniversity of Waterloo, Julian DolbyIBM Research, USA, Frank TipNortheastern University
Pre-print Media Attached
01:33 - 01:34
Talk
Industry Papers
Bennett MackenzieMcMaster University, Canada, Vera PantelicMcMaster University, Canada, Gordon MarksMcMaster University, Canada, Stephen Wynn-WilliamsMcMaster University, Canada, Gehan SelimMcMaster University, Canada, Mark LawfordMcMaster, Alan WassyngMcMaster University, Canada, Moustapha DiabFCA, USA, Feisel WeslatiFCA, USA
DOI
01:35 - 01:36
Talk
Tool Demos
Xiaoqin FuWashington State University, Haipeng CaiWashington State University, USA, Li LiMonash University, Australia
DOI
01:37 - 01:38
Talk
Research Papers
Bobby BruceUniversity of California at Davis, USA, Tianyi ZhangHarvard University, USA, Jaspreet AroraUniversity of California at Los Angeles, USA, Guoqing Harry XuUniversity of California at Los Angeles, Miryung KimUniversity of California at Los Angeles, USA
DOI
01:39 - 01:40
Talk
Research Papers
Sooyoung ChaKorea University, South Korea, Hakjoo OhKorea University
DOI
01:41 - 02:00
Talk
Research Papers
Karim AliUniversity of Alberta, Pengyu NieUniversity of Texas at Austin, USA, SooYoung Chae, Xiaoqin FuWashington State University, Hoda KhalilCarleton University, M: Shin Hwei TanSouthern University of Science and Technology