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Thu 12 Nov 2020 01:32 - 01:34 at Virtual room 1 - Community

Summer of code programs connect students to open source software (OSS) projects, typically during the summer break from school. Analyzing consolidated summer of code programs can reveal how college students, who these programs usually target, can be motivated to participate in OSS, and what onboarding strategies OSS communities adopt to receive these students. In this paper, we study the well-established Google Summer of Code (GSoC) and devise an integrated engagement theory grounded in multiple data sources to explain motivation and onboarding in this context. Our analysis shows that OSS communities employ several strategies for planning and executing student participation, socially integrating the students, and rewarding student’s contributions and achievements. Students are motivated by a blend of rewards, which are moderated by external factors. We presented these rewards and the motivation theory to students who had never participated in a summer of code program and collected their shift in motivation after learning about the theory. New students can benefit from the former students' experiences detailed in our results, and OSS stakeholders can leverage both the insight into students’ motivations for joining such programs as well as the onboarding strategies we identify to devise actions to attract and retain newcomers.

Thu 12 Nov
Times are displayed in time zone: (UTC) Coordinated Universal Time change

01:30 - 01:32
Talk
A First Look at Good First Issues on GitHub
Research Papers
Xin TanPeking University, China, Minghui ZhouPeking University, China, Zeyu SunPeking University, China
DOI
01:32 - 01:34
Talk
A Theory of the Engagement in Open Source Projects via Summer of Code Programs
Research Papers
Jefferson SilvaPUC-SP, Brazil, Igor WieseFederal University of Technology Paraná, Brazil, Daniel M. GermanUniversity of Victoria, Canada, Christoph TreudeUniversity of Adelaide, Australia, Marco GerosaNorthern Arizona University, USA, Igor SteinmacherNorthern Arizona University, USA
DOI
01:35 - 01:36
Talk
Biases and Differences in Code Review using Medical Imaging and Eye-Tracking: Genders, Humans, and Machines
Research Papers
Yu HuangUniversity of Michigan, Kevin LeachUniversity of Michigan, Zohreh SharafiUniversity of Michigan, Nicholas McKayUniversity of Michigan, USA, Tyler SantanderUniversity of California at Santa Barbara, Westley WeimerUniversity of Michigan, USA
DOI
01:37 - 01:38
Talk
Does Stress Impact Technical Interview Performance?
Research Papers
Mahnaz BehrooziNorth Carolina State University, USA, Shivani ShirolkarNorth Carolina State University, USA, Titus BarikMicrosoft, USA, Chris ParninNorth Carolina State University, USA
DOI
01:39 - 01:40
Talk
Reducing Implicit Gender Biases in Software Development: Does Intergroup Contact Theory Work?
Research Papers
Yi WangCoCo Labs, USA, Min ZhangEast China Normal University, China
DOI
01:41 - 02:00
Talk
Conversations on Community
Paper Presentations
Kelly BlincoeUniversity of Auckland, Mahnaz BehrooziNorth Carolina State University, USA, Xin TanPeking University, China, Yi WangRochester Institute of Technology, Yu HuangUniversity of Michigan, M: Peter RigbyConcordia University, Montreal, Canada