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Thu 12 Nov 2020 01:35 - 01:36 at Virtual room 1 - Community

Code review is a critical step in modern software quality assurance, yet it is vulnerable to human biases.
Previous studies have clarified the extent of the problem, particularly regarding biases against the authors of code,but no consensus understanding has emerged.
Advances in medical imaging are increasingly applied to software engineering, supporting grounded neurobiological explorations of computing activities, including the review, reading, and writing of source code.
In this paper, we present the results of a controlled experiment using both medical imaging and also eye tracking to investigate the neurological correlates of biases and differences between genders of humans and machines (e.g., automated program repair tools) in code review.
We find that men and women conduct code reviews differently, in ways that are measurable and supported by behavioral, eye-tracking and medical imaging data.
We also find biases in how humans review code as a function of its apparent author, when controlling for code quality.
In addition to advancing our fundamental understanding of how cognitive biases relate to the code review process, the results may inform subsequent training and tool design to reduce bias.

Thu 12 Nov

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01:30 - 02:00
01:30
2m
Talk
A First Look at Good First Issues on GitHub
Research Papers
Xin Tan Peking University, China, Minghui Zhou Peking University, China, Zeyu Sun Peking University, China
DOI
01:32
2m
Talk
A Theory of the Engagement in Open Source Projects via Summer of Code Programs
Research Papers
Jefferson Silva PUC-SP, Brazil, Igor Wiese Federal University of Technology ParanĂ¡, Brazil, Daniel M. German University of Victoria, Canada, Christoph Treude University of Adelaide, Australia, Marco Gerosa Northern Arizona University, USA, Igor Steinmacher Northern Arizona University, USA
DOI
01:35
1m
Talk
Biases and Differences in Code Review using Medical Imaging and Eye-Tracking: Genders, Humans, and Machines
Research Papers
Yu Huang University of Michigan, Kevin Leach University of Michigan, Zohreh Sharafi University of Michigan, Nicholas McKay University of Michigan, USA, Tyler Santander University of California at Santa Barbara, Westley Weimer University of Michigan, USA
DOI
01:37
1m
Talk
Does Stress Impact Technical Interview Performance?
Research Papers
Mahnaz Behroozi North Carolina State University, USA, Shivani Shirolkar North Carolina State University, USA, Titus Barik Microsoft, USA, Chris Parnin North Carolina State University, USA
DOI
01:39
1m
Talk
Reducing Implicit Gender Biases in Software Development: Does Intergroup Contact Theory Work?
Research Papers
Yi Wang CoCo Labs, USA, Min Zhang East China Normal University, China
DOI
01:41
19m
Talk
Conversations on Community
Paper Presentations
Kelly Blincoe University of Auckland, Mahnaz Behroozi North Carolina State University, USA, Xin Tan Peking University, China, Yi Wang Rochester Institute of Technology, Yu Huang University of Michigan, M: Peter Rigby Concordia University, Montreal, Canada